Podcasts

Long Now Boston has started a podcast series, created from our conversation series. We’ve started with the conversations from our 02019-02020 series. Now you can listen to Long Now Boston conversations wherever you are! See below, or search for “Long Now Boston” wherever you get your podcasts.


Recent Events with Podcasts

For a deep dive into our world of ideas, you can also watch all the videos from our recent conversations.

Perspectives on the Pandemic

A Long Now Boston Virtual Conversation

Long Now Boston has held two virtual conversations in the past month to identify how the Covid-19 pandemic is affecting human society and culture and what the implications may be for us in the long term. The first conversation, with Long Now Boston volunteers, was held April 6. The second, open to Charter Members, was convened on May 11. While the perspectives are varied and the future trajectory of the virus and its impacts are highly uncertain, one thing seems clear:  The COVID-19 pandemic is likely to be the most significant global disruption since the mid 20th century. How we collectively respond to it will shape the history of the 21st century.  

CDC Image of the COVID-19 Virus

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Long Now Boston City Nature Celebration 02020: Observing the Urban Environment

April was Global Citizen Science month. To celebrate, people around the world took part in various citizen projects, from observing the night sky to measuring rainfall. Long Now Boston joined in by participating in the City Nature Challenge. The City Nature Challenge was founded and is organized by the California Academy of Sciences and the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles. It is an international celebration of biodiversity observed and documented in and around urban areas. 

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Long Now Boston Calendar Update

Hello friends!

These are difficult times.

Consistent with the broader efforts to flatten the curve of the COVID-19 pandemic, Long Now Boston has suspended its public live events until further notice.

With regrets we had to cancel “Craft a Superhero” on April 18 and “Dear Tomorrow” on April 21, our two events planned as part of the Cambridge Science Festival.

We plan to resume live events as soon as possible and are looking at options for hosting online community conversations. In the meantime, we’d love to stay connected. Go to our website where you can sign up for our mailing list, find summaries and videos of our past events on the blog, and learn how to become a Long Now Boston member.

Please also follow us on TwitterFacebook and LinkedIn.

The need for long term thinking is greater now than ever before, and the current pandemic is a powerful reminder of that.

Stay safe, everyone. We’ll see you again soon.

Rx for a Better Future: Wisdom Over Recklessness

A Long Now Boston conversation with Bina Venkataraman, March 2, 02020, Cambridge MA. 

In a world dominated by short-term thinking, it is easy to become cynical or jaded about human behavior and the long-term prospects for humanity. Bina Venkataraman has a solution – the pursuit of “wisdom over recklessness.”  Wisdom (“experience, knowledge, and good judgment”) can overcome recklessness (“lack of regard for the danger or consequences of one’s actions”), but it requires a different approach to what we measure, what we reward and what we imagine. Bringing this wisdom to bear on our individual and collective choices requires change and new tools at the individual, cultural and institutional levels, which Bina has documented in her book The Optimist’s Telescope: Thinking Ahead in a Reckless Age. She offered great advice to a large and enthusiastic crowd at the Long Now Boston Conversation event on Monday March 2, 02020, at the CIC in Cambridge, with the help of moderator William Powers.

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Summary by George Gantz for Long Now Boston

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A Conscious Solution to Corporate Short Termism

The way we organize our work has a profound effect on our lives. Raj Sisodia has spent much of his life investigating, describing, and advocating for one particular way of organizing work, which he calls “Conscious Capitalism.” For Long Now Boston’s February gathering, he presented some of his latest thinking on this topic.

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Pathways to Human and Planetary Thriving

Long Now Boston FLASH TALKS 2020.

On January 6, 02020, five Long Now Boston members shared their ideas for improving the long term future for planet earth and the human civilization that inhabits it.  In one way or another, all five speakers touched on the importance of working together towards outcomes that better match our human values and aspirations.   The top vote-getter for the night was Ye Tao of Harvard’s Rowland Institute for his presentation on Mirrors for Earth’s Energy Rebalancing (MEER:ReflEction).  Long Now Boston Board Member George Gantz (ineligible for votes) concluded the event with a presentation on Empathy: The Secret Sauce for Human Thriving.

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Life Among the Stars

Avi Loeb is confident in the existence of extraterrestrial civilizations, and optimistic that confirmation, when achieved, will fundamentally transform the human perspective, just as the Copernican revolution, based on increasingly detailed astronomical observations, did a half-millenium ago.  With the rapid increase in relevant data from more advanced observations and increasingly sophisticated space missions, that confirmation may come soon.

“Our civilization will mature only by leaving home to the cosmic street and meeting others.”  Avi Loeb

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How Humans and Technology Co-Evolve

Long Now Boston Conversation Series
November 4, 02019, at CIC, 1 Broadway, Cambridge MA, with James (“J”) Hughes (IEET) and Nir Eisikovits (UMAEC).

Synopsis: Human species have co-evolved with technology for hundreds of thousands of years.  Fire and stone tools were once the killer apps, giving humans immense advantages – but human physiology and society also evolved with them.  It is no different today, but the stakes are higher, as they include global existential risks, and the pace of change is faster by many orders of magnitude.  It is impossible to plan or to predict the future, but we can shape its trajectory by better understanding the risks and tradeoffs and by seeking to achieve equity in how we govern technology.

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From Synthetic DNA to Billion Year Libraries

Long Now Boston Conversation SeriesOctober 7, 02019, at the Cambridge Innovation Center.
Featuring Dr. Hyunjun Park, CEO of CATALOG DNA, and Nova Spivack, Chairman of Arch Mission Foundation.

Synopsis: Human science and imagination are moving us to a reality we can barely comprehend.  Synthetic DNA is the basis for stunningly efficient data storage and sophisticated computational functionality – yet the microminiaturized manufacturing process defies visualization.  Using this technology, petabytes of data are encoded on strands of DNA and dried into something the size of a sugar cube.  Imagine such a cube layered into a small, superstrong container at the core of a small disk the size of a DVD.  That disk consists of a number of layers of nickel nanofiche analog imagery on top of high-density digital storage layers, bonded with an epoxy in which human and other DNA samples are stored — a complete library of human knowledge and history.  Now imagine those libraries scattered around the earth, on the moon, in orbit around the sun, where they will serve as the backup for planet Earth, lasting billions of years. 

Summary by George Gantz

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