From Synthetic DNA to Billion Year Libraries

Long Now Boston Conversation SeriesOctober 7, 02019, at the Cambridge Innovation Center.
Featuring Dr. Hyunjun Park, CEO of CATALOG DNA, and Nova Spivack, Chairman of Arch Mission Foundation.

Synopsis: Human science and imagination are moving us to a reality we can barely comprehend.  Synthetic DNA is the basis for stunningly efficient data storage and sophisticated computational functionality – yet the microminiaturized manufacturing process defies visualization.  Using this technology, petabytes of data are encoded on strands of DNA and dried into something the size of a sugar cube.  Imagine such a cube layered into a small, superstrong container at the core of a small disk the size of a DVD.  That disk consists of a number of layers of nickel nanofiche analog imagery on top of high-density digital storage layers, bonded with an epoxy in which human and other DNA samples are stored — a complete library of human knowledge and history.  Now imagine those libraries scattered around the earth, on the moon, in orbit around the sun, where they will serve as the backup for planet Earth, lasting billions of years. 

Summary by George Gantz

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DNA – Our Past is Our Future

Long Now Boston Conversation Series
March 4, 02019, at the Cambridge Innovation Center

Featuring Preston Estep, CSO and co-founder Veritas Genetics, and Dennis Grishin, CSO and co-founder, Nebula Genomics

Synopsis: Two leading gen-tech entrepreneurs explored the profound evolutionary transition DNA technologies may bring at the Long Now Boston Conversation on March 4, 02019. However, a positive outcome is not assured unless we carefully navigate the landscape of technical, regulatory, ethical and privacy issues involved.

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Genomes are The Long Now

 Long Now Boston Conversation Series
April 6, 02017

A Long Now Boston Conversation with Mary Mangan, molecular and computational biologist. 

The genomes of organisms around us today, and some of those that are no longer alive, carry crucial information about our past and also frame our future directions. In addition, it’s also becoming possible to “Revive and Restore” lost species. Organizing and visualizing DNA sequence data is key to using it effectively to understand the history of life of this planet, and for potentially using it to create new variations with impacts on our health and environment. 

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